führen englanniksi   usher de, redound de, head de, wage de, pilot de, carry de, guide de, chair de, demean de, lead de, conduct de

Esimerkkilauseet

*: Her entrance into church on Sunday is always the signal for a little bustle in the side aisle, occasioned by a general rise among the poor people, who bow and curtsey until the pew-opener has ushered the old lady into her accustomed seat, dropped a respectful curtsey, and shut the door;

*: Margaret was astonished at the magnificence of the apartments into which she was ushered.

*: Thus the Harvard poets and wits ushered The New England Courant out of existence.

*: For every dram of hony therein found / A pound of gall doth over it redound […].

*: The honour done to our religion ultimately redounds to God, the author of it.

*: The fact that in one case the advance redounds to private advantage and in the other, theoretically, to the public good, does not alter the core assumptions common to both.

*: One thing about the John McCain-didnt-sleep-with-a-lobbyist story redounds to the New York Times credit.

: His infamous behaviour only redounded back upon him when he was caught.

*: The evil, soon driven back, redounded as a flood on those from whom it sprung.

: ux|en|Be careful when you pet that dog on the head; it may bite.

: ux|en|The company is looking for people with good heads for business.

: ux|en|He has no head for heights.

: ux|en|This song keeps going through my head.

*: he took them seriously, too, just as seriously as he took the ‘head’ that followed after drink.

: ux|en|a laced head;   a head of hair

: ux|en|Admission is three dollars a head.

: ux|en|200 head of cattle and 50 head of horses

: ux|en|12 head of big cattle and 14 head of branded calves

: ux|en|at five years of age this head of cattle is worth perhaps $40

: ux|en|a reduction in the assessment per head of sheep

: ux|en|they shot 20 head of quail

: ux|en|we have a heavy head of deer this year;  planting the hedges increased the head of quail and doves

: ux|en|What does it say at the head of the page?

: ux|en|During meetings, the supervisor usually sits at the head of the table.

: ux|en|Hit the nail on the head!

: ux|en|The head of the compass needle is pointing due north.

: ux|en|Tap the head of the drum for this roll.

: ux|en|The heads of your tape player need to be cleaned.

: ux|en|Pour me a fresh beer; this one has no head.

: ux|en|The king sat at the head of the table.

*: an army of fourscore thousand troops, with the duke Marlborough at the head of them

: ux|en|Id like to speak to the head of the department.

: ux|en|Police arrested the head of the gang in a raid last night.

: ux|en|I was called into the heads office to discuss my behaviour.

: ux|en|Only true heads know this.

: ux|en|The expedition followed the river all the way to the head.

: ux|en|Give me a head of lettuce.

: ux|en|Ive got to go to the head.

: rfquotek|Knight

: ux|en|We are having a difficult time making head against this wind.

: ux|en|We will consider performance issues under the head of future improvements.

: ux|en|These isses are going to come to a head today.

*: Ere foul sin, gathering head, shall break into corruption.

*: The indisposition which has long hung upon me, is at last grown to such a head, that it must quickly make an end of me or of itself.

: ux|en|Let the engine build up a good head of steam.

: ux|en|She gave great head.

*: Then I saw the more advanced narcotic addicts, who shot unbelievable doses of powerful heroin in the main line – the vein of their arms; the hysien users; chloroform sniffers, who belonged to the riff-raff element of the dope chippeys, who mingled freely with others of their kind; canned heat stiffs, paragoric hounds, laudanum fiends, and last but not least, the veronal heads.

*: The hutch now looks like a “Turkish bath,” and the heads have their arms around one another, passing the pipe and snapping their fingers as they sing Smokey Robinsons “Tracks of My Tears” into the night.

*: My lord, my lord, the French have gathered head.

: rfquotek|Jonathan Swift

: ux|en|the head cook

: ux|en|head sea;   head wind

: Who heads the board of trustees?

: to head an army, an expedition, or a riot

: We are going to head up North for our holiday. We will [[head off]] tomorrow. Next holiday we will head out West, or head to Chicago. Right now I need to head into town to do some shopping.

: Im fed up working for a boss. Im going to head out on my own, [[set up]] my own business.

: How does the ship head?

: The salmon are first headed and then scaled.

*: A broad river, that heads in the great Blue Ridge.

: This kind of cabbage heads early.

: to head a nail

: rfquotek|Spenser

: to head trees

: rfquotek|Shakespeare

: to head a drove of cattle; to head a person; the wind heads a ship

: to head a cask

*: My life I never held but as a pawn / To wage against thy enemies.

: rfquotek|Hakluyt

*: too weak to wage an instant trial with the king

*: to wake and wage a danger profitless

*: Thenne said Arthur I wille goo with yow / Nay said the kynges ye shalle not at this tyme / for ye haue moche to doo yet in these landes / therfore we wille departe / and with the grete goodes that we haue goten in these landes by youre yeftes we shalle wage good knyghtes & withstande the kynge Claudas malyce

*: abundance of treasure which he had in store, wherewith he might wage soldiers

*: [He pondered] which of all his sons was fit / To reign and wage immortal war with wit.

*: The two are waging war, and the one triumphs by the destruction of the other.

*: Thou...must wage thy works for wealth.

: rfquotek|Burrill

: rfquotek|Dryden

*: So we mounted our horses, and put out for that town, under the direction of two friendly Creeks we had taken for pilots.

: We would like to run a pilot in your facility before rolling out the program citywide.

: The pilot plant showed the need for major process changes.

*: Julia has become quite a good kite pilot. She has learned how to repeatedly buzz her fathers head, coming within two feet, and not hitting him.

*: "By means of the Golden Cap I shall command the Winged Monkeys to carry you to the gates of the Emerald City," said Glinda, "for it would be a shame to deprive the people of so wonderful a ruler."

*: Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers, of errand not wholly obvious to their fellows, yet of such sort as to call into query alike the nature of their errand and their own relations. It is easily earned repetition to state that Josephine St. Aubans was a presence not to be concealed.

: ux|en|to carry the war from Greece into Asia;  to carry an account to the ledger

: ux|en|The builders are going to carry the chimney through nowrap|the roof.  They would have carried the road ten miles further, but ran nowrap|out of materials.

*: Go, carry Sir John Falstaff to the Fleet.

*: He carried away all his cattle.

*: Passion and revenge will carry them too far.

: ux|en|The corner drugstore doesnt carry his favorite brand of aspirin.

: ux|en|I think I can carry Smiths work while she is out.

: ux|en|Five and nine are fourteen; carry the one to the tens place.

: ux|en|Always carry sufficient insurance to protect against a loss.

: ux|en|The sound of the bells carried for miles on the wind.

*: It might seem easy to hit the head of a barrel at that distance, but either the lads were not expert enough or else the snowballs, being of irregular shapes and rather light, did not carry well. Whatever the cause, the fact remained that the barrel received only a few scattering shots and these on the outer edges of the head.

: ux|en|she always carries a purse;  marsupials carry their young in a pouch

: The doctor said shes carrying twins.

: ux|en|A gun or mortar carries well.

: ux|en|to carry well, i.e. to hold the head high, with arching neck

: rfquotek|Johnson

: ux|en|The Tories carried the election.

*: The greater part carries it.

*: the carrying of our main point

*: The town would have been carried in the end.

*: He thought it carried something of argument in it.

*: It carries too great an imputation of ignorance.

*: He carried himself so insolently in the house, and out of the house, to all persons, that he became odious.

: ux|en|A merchant is carrying a large stock;  nowrap|a farm carries nowrap|a mortgage;  nowrap|a broker carries stock for nowrap|a customer;  nowrap|to carry a life insurance.

: Adjust your carry from time to time so that you dont tire too quickly.

*: On paper, simply add the carry to the next addition; that is, $B2 + $9C + 1. Thats fine for paper, but how is it done by computer?

: The guide led us around the museum and explained the exhibits.

*: He will be our guide, even unto death.

*: Guide me to your sovereigns court.

*: He will guide his affairs with discretion.

: ux|en|All I need to weather a snowstorm is hot coffee, a warm fire, a good book and a comfortable chair.

: ux|en|Under the rules of order adopted by the board, the chair may neither make nor second motions.

: ux|en|My violin teacher used to play first chair with the Boston Pops.

: ux|en|He killed a cop: hes going to get the chair.

: ux|en|The court will show no mercy; if he gets convicted, its the chair for him.

: rfquotek|Shakespeare

*: Think what an equipage thou hast in air, / And view with scorn two pages and a chair.

: Bob will chair tomorrows meeting.

*: The time you won your town the race

*: We chaired you through the marketplace.

: The poet was chaired at the national Eisteddfod.

*: Her son would demean himself by a marriage with an artists daughter.

*: [Our] clergy have with violence demeaned the matter.

*: They have demeaned themselves / Like men born to renown by life or death.

*: They answered ... that they should demean themselves according to their instructions.

*: vile demean and usage bad

*: ‘When thou hast all this doen, then bring me newes / Of his demeane […].’

*: with grave demean and solemn vanity

: This copy has too much lead; I prefer less space between the lines.

:* I would have the tower two stories, and goodly leads upon the top. — [[w:Francis Bacon|Bacon]]

: They pumped him full of lead.

: to lead a page; leaded matter

: ux|en|a father leads a child;  a jockey leads a horse with a halter;  a dog leads a blind man

*: If a blind man lead a blind man, both fall down in the ditch.

*: They thrust him out of the city, and led him unto the brow of the hill.

*: In thy right hand lead with thee / The mountain nymph, sweet Liberty.

*: The Lord went before them by day in a pillar of a cloud, to lead them the way.

*: He leadeth me beside the still waters.

*: This thought might lead me through the world’s vain mask. Content, though blind, had I no better guide.

*: Christ took not upon him flesh and blood that he might conquer and rule nations, lead armies, or possess places.

: ux|en|The evidence leads me to believe he is guilty.

*: That we may lead a quiet and peaceable life.

*: Nor thou with shadowd hint confuse / A life that leads melodious days.

*: You remember...the life he used to lead his wife and daughter.

: ux|en|the big sloop led the fleet of yachts;  the Guards led the attack;  Demosthenes leads the orators of all ages

*: As Hesperus, that leads the sun his way.

*: And lo! Ben Adhems name led all the rest.

: ux|en|He led the ace of spades.

: ux|en|The batter always leads off base.

*: He was driven by the necessities of the times, more than led by his own disposition, to any rigor of actions.

*: Silly women, laden with sins, led away by divers lusts.

: ux|en|the path leads to the mill;  gambling leads to other vices

*: The mountain-foot that leads towards Mantua.

: ux|en|The shock led to a change in his behaviour.

:* At the time I speak of, and having a momentary lead, ... I am sure I did my country important service. — w|Edmund Burke

: The runner took his lead from first.

: The investigation stalled when all leads turned out to be dead ends.

: Joe is a great addition to our sales team, he has numerous leads in the paper industry.

: The contestants are all tied; no one has the lead position.

*: There are other restrictions imposed upon the conduct of war, not by the law of nature primarily, but by the laws of war first, and by the law of nature as seconding and ratifying the laws of war.

*: the conduct of the state, the administration of its affairs

*: Conduct of armies is a princes art.

*: ... attacked the Spaniards ... with great impetuosity, but with so little conduct, that his forces were totally routed.

: Good conduct will be rewarded and likewise poor conduct will be punished.

*: All these difficulties were increased by the conduct of Shrewsbury.

*: What in the conduct of our life appears / So well designed, so luckily begun, / But when we have our wish, we wish undone?

*: the book of Job, in conduct and diction

*: I will be your conduct.

*: In my conduct shall your ladies come.

*: although thou hast been conduct of my chame

*: I can conduct you, lady, to a low / But loyal cottage, where you may be safe.

: to conduct the affairs of a kingdom

*: Little skilled in the art of conducting a siege.

: He conducted himself well.

*: For a while, Walter Pohlmann, a well-known German conductor, conducted the orchestra in Compound 3. Later, Willi Mets, who had conducted the world-renowned Leipzig Symphony Orchestra, conducted the Compound 3 orchestra.

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